Smilemaker – The Film

Born and raised in war-torn Somalia, Farxiyo Geire, guided by spiritual strength, immense courage and vivid prophetic dreams, runs alone in the ominous jungle toward freedom in America.
In 1980, life in Mogadishu is nearly perfect for the Geire family: the shiny blue ocean dotted with small, brightly painted fishing boats, the sweet sounds of singing in the streets…Mogadishu is a bustling, happy place.
Precocious FARXIYO GEIRE (4) lives in an elegant mansion
surrounded by lush mango, guava, and papaya trees. Farxiyo’s
father, ABSHIR, is a general and military doctor, a wealthy,
revered chief of the Darod clan. Farxiyo’s mother, HALIMA , is a
much younger, very beautiful clan princess. Farxiyo laughs and
plays in the streets with younger brothers ALI-NASIR and
ABDIKAREN; Farxiyo’s sisters, SAYNAB , FADUMA and HAMDA are born
later.
Abshir is elected chief of the Hawiye clan, and his possessive
nature leads him to isolate Halima and the family by moving them
to a village called Heelwaayne. Their life of luxury is no more.
At Heelwaayne, Halima raises her children living off the land. At
seven months pregnant, she carries her baby, balances water on her
head, and manages loads of grass and tree branches on her back.
At only four years old, Farxiyo becomes a shepherd girl,
responsible for her family’s cattle. For years, each day Farxiyo
is bullied and beaten to the brink of death by the enemy clan.
Unconscious, she awakens in the bush to hyenas smelling her body
as potential food. The sun sets; the cows are no where to be
found. In a panic, Farxiyo runs into the jungle searching for
them. Flies follow her bloody smell. Badly bruised, Farxiyo
arrives home. Overworked, perpetually pregnant Halima sees Farxiyo
without the cows and screams at her for daydreaming. Enraged,
Halima attacks Farxiyo and chokes her to the point of
unconsciousness. Now, Halima rushes to find the cows while
facing the dangers hidden in the jungle.
Farxiyo is a daydreamer, though she knows she is destined for
greatness. Farxiyo prays for a sign, for The Creator to show her a
better world. Later that day, at the military base, she sees a
fashion magazine from the United States. The smiling cover model
speaks to Farxiyo of hope. From this day on, Farxiyo’s world is
never the same. She now is determined to create her future in
America.
When Farxiyo is nine, Halima forces her to undergo the Muslim
tradition of female circumcision. Farxiyo continues to be bullied
by young enemy clan members which leads to a street fight between
Halima and Farxiyo and the neighborhood bully and her mother.
After years of hard labor, Halima , with the help of her brother,
Mohammed, negotiate with clan elders to move the family back to
Mogadishu. The bullying finally ceases. Spring 1989 is the
happiest time of eleven year old Farxiyo’s life.
In Mogadishu, the family returns to the mansion where they had
lived nine years earlier. Halima opens a vegetable market. Farxiyo
attends school. Life is sweet. Until one morning, in the winter of
1991, the government is overthrown by Hawiye rebels. Bombs sound
like popcorn exploding in the sky. People scatter everywhere and
scream in complete chaos, running for their lives.
Months pass as the family runs from the shots of genocide. They
head toward Kenya with a group, surviving on bruised berries and
tree sap. Images of body parts, women, babies shot from behind
haunt Farxiyo. Hunger ensues, and some people resort to
cannibalism. On the journey, they hear that Abshir is killed in a
military operation.
A year later, they make it to Halima’s father’s territory near
Kenya, where they celebrate with family. Still, Farxiyo feels sure
that her destiny is in America. Her spirit unwavering, Farxiyo
joins a group of men who plan to travel on foot to a refugee camp
on the border of Kenya. On the first night of the journey, the men
trick Farxiyo and abandon her. Farxiyo is on her own in the bush.
Alone in the jungle for twelve months, Farxiyo sleeps in holes
that she digs with her hands. She wakes up startled, surrounded by
snakes. A branch cuts her thumb and it becomes infected. She must
burn her thumb in fire to treat the infection. Barely alive,
emaciated Farxiyo, too weak to get out of the hole she hides in,
sees a lion at close range staring at her. After a staring-match
between them, Farxiyo asks the lion why it just will not end her
misery. Strangely, the lion leads Farxiyo to a water hole. No
animals bother her; butterflies kiss her wounds. This rejuvenates
Farxiyo and soon she reaches the Kenyan border.
Farxiyo is taken to the Hagadera Refugee Camp; within weeks,
Farxiyo travels to retrieve her family and bring them to Hagadera.
It is 1993 when the Sheikh family settles there. Each day, Farxiyo
stands in line for food for hours. At night, her vivid, prophetic
dreams begin. Concerned, Halima believes Farxiyo is possessed by
evil spirits and takes her to a witch doctor to rid her of her
demons. Ironically, a holy man reveals Farxiyo’s bright future.
One night, while Farxiyo, Halima, and IDLE, Farxiyo’s aunt, sleep,
terrorists storm into their tents intending to brutally rape and
kill them. Idle screams and will not cooperate; the terrorists
beat her with a rifle. Idle distracts the terrorists and, in turn,
saves all of their lives. Farxiyo jumps over a fifteen foot high
fence to escape as the gunmen shoot at her.
In 1995, Farxiyo is hired by the United Nations Higher Commission
for Refugees as an elementary teacher. When she discovers that
some of her students have been raped, Farxiyo speaks out and
demands that the girls be protected. Farxiyo is told to mind her
own business, even from Halima. Farxiyo does not turn away. One of
the victim’s parents is ashamed and has a Kenyan soldier arrest
and imprison Farxiyo. In the end, Farxiyo does make a difference;
the school is closed down for investigations.
For years, Farxiyo writes to immigration offices in Nairobi for
permission to travel to America. No response. Against Halima’s
wishes, she journeys to Nairobi on her own. Farxiyo’s plan: to
apply for political asylum in the United States. Instead, she gets
arrested and locked up in a rat and snake-infested jail and is
taken back to the refugee camp.
After several attempts, Farxiyo makes it to the embassy and is
granted refugee resettlement status. Her brother, Ali-Nasir,
pleads with her to stay. He begs her to preserve her traditional
values, her culture, and her connection to her family. Tears fall.
Farxiyo boards the plane feeling somewhat hollow, frightened,
while bubbling with an unfamiliar excitement. Twenty years of
visualizing and anticipating this moment, Farxiyo cannot breathe.
Despite all of the terrorists, cannibals, starvation, ghosts,
isolation, this flight is even more terrifying. The flight
attendant provides oxygen. Farxiyo feels a lightness beneath her
feet as the plane takes off; she ascends.
Written by: Marci Winters and Layla Farxiyo Sheikh Geire
512-662-0904
808-205-4624
Marcicoach@yahoo.com
Laylaruns@gmail.com
c WGA